Archive

Oracle XE

Every DBA working with the Oracle database must have seen memory dumps in tracefiles. It is present in ORA-600 (internal error) ORA-7445 (operating system error), system state dumps, process state dumps and a lot of other dumps.

This is how it looks likes:

Dump of memory from 0x00007F06BF9A9E00 to 0x00007F06BF9ADE00
7F06BF9A9E00 0000C215 0000001F 00000CC1 0401FFFF  [................]
7F06BF9A9E10 000032F3 00010003 00000002 442B0000  [.2............+D]
7F06BF9A9E20 2F415441 31323156 4F2F3230 4E494C4E  [ATA/V12102/ONLIN]
7F06BF9A9E30 474F4C45 6F72672F 315F7075 3735322E  [ELOG/group_1.257]
7F06BF9A9E40 3336382E 36313435 00003338 00000000  [.863541683......]
7F06BF9A9E50 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000  [................]

The first column is the memory location in hexadecimal.
The second to fifth columns represent the actual memory values in hexadecimal.
The sixth column shows an ASCII representation of the memory contents. If a position does not represent an ASCII character, a dot (“.”) is printed.

Actually, the values in the second to fifth column are grouped in four columns. This is how the values in a column look like:
{hex val}{hex val}{hex val}{hex val}, for example: 00010203 means: 0, 1, 2, 3.

In the ASCII representation (sixth column) the spaces after every four values are not put in.

However, look at the following line:

7F06BF9A9E10 000032F3 00010003 00000002 442B0000  [.2............+D]

And focus on the last four characters:
“..+D” (two non-printables, plus, D)
Now look at the corresponding memory contents from the dump:
“442B0000″ This is: “44 2B 00 00″, which should correspond to “. . + D”.
There is something the matter here: the plus and the D seem to be represented by “00”. That’s not correct.

Let’s see what “442B0000″ actually represents in ASCI:

$ echo -e "\x44\x2B\x00\x00"
D+

Ah! That looks backwards! Let’s take a full line and see what that gives:
(This is the line with memory address 0x7F06BF9A9E20)

$ echo -e "\x2F\x41\x54\x41 \x31\x32\x31\x56 \x4F\x2F\x32\x30 \x4E\x49\x4C\x4E"
/ATA 121V O/20 NILN

So if you want to look at the actual memory contents, you need to start with the column on the left side, read the values from right to left, then go the next column, etc.

Endianness
Actual, I asked my friend Philippe Fierens for a trace file from a SPARC (big endian) platform, to see if the endianness of the platform was causing this. I test my stuff on Linux, which is little endian.

Here’s a little snippet:

Dump of memory from 0xFFFFFFFF7D977E00 to 0xFFFFFFFF7D97BE00
FFFFFFFF7D977E00 15C20000 00000001 00000000 00000104  [................]
FFFFFFFF7D977E10 F4250000 00000000 0B200400 E2EB8A3D  [.%....... .....=]
FFFFFFFF7D977E20 44475445 53540000 32F6D98B 00000590  [DGTEST..2.......]
FFFFFFFF7D977E30 00004000 00000001 00000000 00000000  [..@.............]
FFFFFFFF7D977E40 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000  [................]

Let’s test the line from address 0xFFFFFFFF7D977E20:

[oracle@bigmachine [v12102] trace]$ echo -e "\x44\x47\x54\x45 \x53\x54\x00\x00 \x32\xF6\xD9\x8B \x00\x00\x05\x90"
DGTE ST 2� �

So, the endianness determines how the raw memory contents should be read.

This is the 4th post in a series of posts on PGA behaviour of Oracle. Earlier posts are: here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12), here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2) and the quiz on using PGA with AMM, into which this blogpost dives deeper.

As laid out in the quiz blogpost, I have a database with the following specifics:
-Oracle Linux x86_64 6u6.
-Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 4
-Oracle database (single instance) with the following parameter set: memory_target=1G. No other memory related parameters set.

In this setup, I run the pga_filler script (source code here), which creates a collection until the session statistic ‘session pga memory’ exceeds the grow_until variable, which for this case I set to 2100000000 (approximately 2.1G).

So: the instance is set to have AMM (memory_target) with a size of 1GB, which is supposed to be the total amount memory which this instance uses, and a session runs a PL/SQL procedure which only stops if it has allocated 2.1GB, which is clearly more than configured with the memory_target parameter. Please mind a collection, which the anonymous procedure uses to allocate memory, is outside of the memory areas for which Oracle can move data to the assigned temporary tablespace (sort, hash and bitmap memory areas).

After startup of the instance with only memory_target set to 1G, the memory partitioning looks like this:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> select component, current_size/power(1024,2), last_oper_type from v$memory_dynamic_components where current_size != 0;

COMPONENT							 CURRENT_SIZE/POWER(1024,2) LAST_OPER_TYP
---------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------- -------------
shared pool										168 STATIC
large pool										  4 STATIC
java pool										  4 STATIC
SGA Target										612 STATIC
DEFAULT buffer cache									424 INITIALIZING
PGA Target										412 STATIC

This is how v$pgastat looks like:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> select * from v$pgastat;

NAME								      VALUE UNIT
---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- ------------
aggregate PGA target parameter					  432013312 bytes
aggregate PGA auto target					  318200832 bytes
global memory bound						   86402048 bytes
total PGA inuse 						   78572544 bytes
total PGA allocated						   90871808 bytes
maximum PGA allocated						   93495296 bytes
total freeable PGA memory					    2818048 bytes
process count								 57
max processes count							 58
PGA memory freed back to OS					    3211264 bytes
total PGA used for auto workareas					  0 bytes
maximum PGA used for auto workareas					  0 bytes
total PGA used for manual workareas					  0 bytes
maximum PGA used for manual workareas					  0 bytes
over allocation count							  0
bytes processed 						    8479744 bytes
extra bytes read/written						  0 bytes
cache hit percentage							100 percent
recompute count (total) 						 18

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> show parameter pga

NAME				     TYPE	 VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------
pga_aggregate_target		     big integer 0

Okay, so far so good. v$memory_dynamic_components shows the PGA Target being 412M, and v$pgastat shows the aggregate PGA target setting being 412M too. I haven’t set pga_aggregate_target (as shown with ‘show parameter pga’), because I am using memory_target/AMM for the argument I hear the most in favour of it: one knob to tune.

Next up, I start the pga_filler script, which means the session starts to allocate PGA.

I keep a close watch using v$pgastat:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> select * from v$pgastat;

NAME								      VALUE UNIT
---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- ------------
aggregate PGA target parameter					  432013312 bytes
aggregate PGA auto target					  124443648 bytes
global memory bound						   86402048 bytes
total PGA inuse 						  296896512 bytes
total PGA allocated						  313212928 bytes
maximum PGA allocated						  313212928 bytes

This shows the pga_filler script in progress by looking at v$pgastat from another session. The total amount of PGA allocated has grown to 313212928 (298M) here.

A little while later, the amount of PGA taken has grown beyond the PGA target (only relevant rows):

total PGA inuse 						  628974592 bytes
total PGA allocated						  645480448 bytes
maximum PGA allocated						  645480448 bytes

However, when looking at the memory components using v$memory_dynamic_components, it gives the impression PGA memory is still 412M:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> select component, current_size/power(1024,2), last_oper_type from v$memory_dynamic_components where current_size != 0;

COMPONENT							 CURRENT_SIZE/POWER(1024,2) LAST_OPER_TYP
---------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------- -------------
shared pool										168 STATIC
large pool										  4 STATIC
java pool										  4 STATIC
SGA Target										612 STATIC
DEFAULT buffer cache									424 INITIALIZING
PGA Target										412 STATIC

You could argue PGA is explicitly mentioned as ‘PGA Target’, but then: the total of the memory area’s (PGA Target+SGA Target) do show a size that roughly sums up to be equal to the memory_target.

A little while later, this is what v$pgastat is showing:

total PGA inuse 						  991568896 bytes
total PGA allocated						 1008303104 bytes
maximum PGA allocated						 1008303104 bytes

Another glimpse at v$memory_dynamic_components shows the same output as above, PGA Target at 412M. This is the point where it get’s a bit weird: the total amount of PGA memory (according to v$pgastat) shows it’s almost 1G, memory_target is set at 1G, and yet v$memory_dynamic_components show no change at all.

Again a little further in time:

total PGA inuse 						 1325501440 bytes
total PGA allocated						 1342077952 bytes
maximum PGA allocated						 1342077952 bytes

Okay, here it get’s really strange: there’s more memory allocated for PGA memory alone than has been set with memory_target for both PGA and SGA memory structures. Also, v$memory_dynamic_components shows no change in SGA memory structures or exchange of memory from SGA to PGA memory.

If v$pgastat is correct, and memory_target actively limits the total amount of both SGA and PGA, then the session must allocate memory out of thin air! But I guess you already came to the conclusion too that either v$pgastat is incorrect, or memory_target does not limit memory allocations (as at least I think it would do).

Let’s dump the PGA heap of the active process to see the real memory allocations of this process:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> oradebug setospid 9041
Oracle pid: 58, Unix process pid: 9041, image: oracle@bigmachine.local (TNS V1-V3)
SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> oradebug unlimit
Statement processed.
SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> oradebug dump heapdump 1
Statement processed.

(9041 is the PID of the process running PL/SQL)

Now look into (the relevant) data of the PGA heap dump:

[oracle@bigmachine [v11204] trace]$ grep Total\ heap\ size v11204_ora_9041.trc
Total heap size    =1494712248
Total heap size    =    65512
Total heap size    =  1638184

Okay, this is clear: the process actually took 1494712248 (=1425M) plus a little more memory. So, memory_target isn’t that much of a hard setting after all.

But where does this memory come from? There ought to be a sort of combined memory effort together with the SGA for memory, right? That was the memory_target promise!

Let’s take a look at the actual memory allocations of a new foreground process in /proc/PID/maps:

[oracle@bigmachine [v11204] trace]$ less /proc/11405/maps
00400000-0bcf3000 r-xp 00000000 fc:02 405855559                          /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1/bin/oracle
0bef2000-0c0eb000 rw-p 0b8f2000 fc:02 405855559                          /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1/bin/oracle
0c0eb000-0c142000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
0c962000-0c9c6000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
60000000-60001000 r--s 00000000 00:10 351997                             /dev/shm/ora_v11204_232652803_0
60001000-60400000 rw-s 00001000 00:10 351997                             /dev/shm/ora_v11204_232652803_0
...
9fc00000-a0000000 rw-s 00000000 00:10 352255                             /dev/shm/ora_v11204_232685572_252
a0000000-a0400000 rw-s 00000000 00:10 354306                             /dev/shm/ora_v11204_232718341_0
3bb3000000-3bb3020000 r-xp 00000000 fc:00 134595                         /lib64/ld-2.12.so
3bb321f000-3bb3220000 r--p 0001f000 fc:00 134595                         /lib64/ld-2.12.so
3bb3220000-3bb3221000 rw-p 00020000 fc:00 134595                         /lib64/ld-2.12.so
3bb3221000-3bb3222000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
3bb3400000-3bb3401000 r-xp 00000000 fc:00 146311                         /lib64/libaio.so.1.0.1
...
3bb5e16000-3bb5e17000 rw-p 00016000 fc:00 150740                         /lib64/libnsl-2.12.so
3bb5e17000-3bb5e19000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
7f018415a000-7f018416a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018416a000-7f018417a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018417a000-7f018418a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018418a000-7f018419a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018419a000-7f01841aa000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841aa000-7f01841ba000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841ba000-7f01841ca000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841ca000-7f01841da000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841da000-7f01841ea000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841ea000-7f01841fa000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f01841fa000-7f018420a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018420a000-7f018421a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f018421a000-7f018422a000 rw-p 00000000 00:05 1030                       /dev/zero
7f68d497b000-7f68d4985000 r-xp 00000000 fc:02 268585089                  /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1/lib/libnque11.so
...

When I run the pga_filler anonymous PL/SQL block, and strace (system call trace) utility, I see (snippet):

mmap(0x7f0194f7a000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194f7a000
mmap(0x7f0194f8a000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194f8a000
mmap(0x7f0194f9a000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194f9a000
mmap(0x7f0194faa000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194faa000
mmap(0x7f0194fba000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194fba000
mmap(0x7f0194fca000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194fca000
mmap(0x7f0194fda000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194fda000
mmap(NULL, 1048576, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_NORESERVE, 6, 0xea000) = 0x7f0194e6a000
mmap(0x7f0194e6a000, 65536, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194e6a000
mmap(0x7f0194e7a000, 131072, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194e7a000
mmap(0x7f0194e9a000, 131072, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194e9a000
mmap(0x7f0194eba000, 131072, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED, 6, 0) = 0x7f0194eba000

So, when looking back, it’s very easy to spot the SGA memory, which resides in /dev/shm in my case, and looks like ‘/dev/shm/ora_v11204_232652803_0′ in the above /proc/PID/maps snippet.
This means that the mmap() calls are simply, as anyone would have guessed by now, the PGA memory allocations. In the maps snippet these are visible as being mapped to /dev/zero.
When looking at the mmap() call, at the 5th argument, which is the number 6, we look at a file descriptor. In /proc/PID/fd the file descriptors can be seen, and file descriptor 6 is /dev/zero, as you probably suspected. This way the allocated memory is initial set to zero.

By now, the pga_filler script finishes:

TS@v11204 > @pga_filler
begin pga size : 3908792
last  pga size : 2100012216
begin uga size : 1607440
last  uga size : 2000368
parameter pat  : 0

Taking the entire 2.1G I made the collection to grow to. With memory_target set to 1G.

Conclusion
The first conclusion I made is that PGA memory is very much different than SGA/shared memory. Anyone with a background in Oracle operating-system troubleshooting will find this quite logical. However, the “promise” AMM/memory_target made, in my interpretation, is that the memory would be used seamless. This is simply not the case. Shared memory is in /dev/shm, and PGA is mmaped/allocated as private memory.

Still, this wouldn’t be that much of an issue if memory_target would limit memory in a rigid way, and memory could, and actually would, very easily float between PGA and SGA. It simply doesn’t.

Why don’t we see Oracle trying to reallocate memory? This is the point where I can only guess.

– Probably, Oracle would try to grow the shared pool if it has problems allocating memory for SQL, library cache, etc. This probably hasn’t happened in my test.
– Probably, Oracle would try to grow the buffer cache if it can calculate a certain benefit from enlarging it. This probably hasn’t happened in my test.
– The other SGA area’s (large and java pool) probably are grown if these are used, and need more space for allocations. This probably didn’t happen in my test.
– For the PGA, a wild guess is the memory manager calculates using the workarea sizes (sort, hash and bitmap areas), which are not noticeably used in my test.

Another conclusion and opinion is AMM/memory_target is not a set once and forget option. In fact, it isn’t that much of a difference from using ASMM from a DBA perspective: you carefully need to understand the SGA size, and you carefully need to (try to) manage the PGA memory. Or reasoned the other way around: the only way you can sensibly set memory_target is if you know the correct SGA size and the PGA usage. Also having Oracle manage the memory area’s automatically is not unique to AMM: Oracle will reallocate (inside the SGA) if it finds it necessary, with AMM, ASMM and even manual set memory area’s. But the big dis-advantage of AMM (at least on linux, not sure about other operating systems) is that huge pages can’t be used, which has a severe impact on “real life” databases, in my experience. (Solaris CAN use huge pages with AMM(!)).

A final word: of course I tested a very specific situation. In most real-life cases there will be multiple sessions, and the PGA manageable memory areas will be used. However, the point I try to make is memory_target is simply not a way to very easily make your database be hard limited to the value set. Probably, in real life, the real amount of memory used by the instance will in the area of the value set with memory_target, but this will be subject to what memory areas you are exactly using. Of course it can differ in a spectaculair way if collections or alike structures are used by a large number of sessions.

This is a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database makes use of PGA. Earlier posts can be found here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12) and here (PGA limiting for Oracle 11.2).

Today a little wednesday fun: a quiz.

What do you think will happen in the following situation (leave a response as comment please!):

-Oracle Linux x86_64 6u6.
-Oracle database 11.2.0.4 PSU 4
-Oracle database (single instance) with the following parameter set: memory_target=1G. No other memory related parameters set.

Run the pga_filler script (which can be found here (PGA limiting for Oracle 12)), with grow_until set to 2100000000 (approximately 2.1G).

I’ll try to create a blogpost on the outcome and an explanation on short notice!

This is the second part of a series of blogpost on Oracle database PGA usage. See the first part here. The first part described SGA and PGA usage, their distinction (SGA being static, PGA being variable), the problem (no limitation for PGA allocations outside of sort, hash and bitmap memory), a resolution for Oracle 12 (PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT), and some specifics about that (it doesn’t look like a very hard limit).

But this leaves out Oracle version 11.2. In reality, the vast majority of the database that I deal with at the time of writing is at version 11.2, and my guess is that this is not just the databases I deal with, but a general tendency. This could change in the coming time with the desupport of Oracle 11.2, however I suspect the installed base of Oracle version 12 to increase gradually and smoothly instead of in a big bang.

With version 11.2 there’s no PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT. This simply means there is no official way to limit the PGA. Full stop. However, there is an undocumented event to limit PGA usage: event 10261. This means that if you want to use this in a production database, you should ask Oracle support to bless the usage of it. On the other hand, Oracle corporation made this event public in an official white paper: Exadata consolidation best practices.

Let’s test event 10261! I’ve got the same table (T2) setup, a description how to set this up, and the anonymous PL/SQL code to allocate PGA using a collection is in the first part. I am using a database version 11.2.0.4 with PSU 4 applied. The reason for choosing this version is that if you run a serious business on Oracle 11.2, THAT should be the version you should be running on!
(disclaimer: everything shown in this blogpost is purely for educational purposes. Do test everything thoroughly before applying this to a production system. Behaviour can or may be different in your specific situation)
The reason for this disclaimer: Bernhard (@bdcbuning_gridit) tweeted that he was warned that when setting it at the instance level, it could crash the instance. I am not sure if this means setting it at runtime, this event is always evaluated at the instance level.

Okay, let’s replicate more or less the test done to Oracle version 12.1.0.2 in the first part. In this database PGA_AGGREGATE_SIZE is set to 500M, now let’s try to set the event to 600M, which means we set the PGA limit to 600M:
This is setting the event on runtime:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> alter system set events = '10261 trace name context forever, level 600000';

System altered.

This is setting the event in the spfile (which means you need a restart of the instance to activate this event, or the above syntax to set it on runtime):

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> alter system set event = '10261 trace name context forever, level 600000' scope=spfile;

System altered.

The level is the amount of memory to which the PGA must be limited, in kilobytes.

Now start the anonymous PL/SQL block to fill up the PGA with a collection, again set to 900M:

TS@v11204 > @pga_filler
declare
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-10260: limit size (600000) of the PGA heap set by event 10261 exceeded
ORA-06512: at line 20

That’s nice! There’s actually a meaningful, describing error message which explains why this PL/SQL block ended!

Let’s look at the actual PGA memory used, as reported by v$pgastat:

SYS@v11204 AS SYSDBA> select value/power(1024,2) from v$pgastat where name = 'maximum PGA allocated';

VALUE/POWER(1024,2)
-------------------
	 676.078125

This is different than setting PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT, however there’s still more memory allocated than set as the limit (600000KB), but lesser (676M in 11.2.0.4 versus 1041M in 12.1.0.2). The outside visibility of the limiting happening is different too: there is NO notice of a process hitting the PGA limit set in the alert.log file nor the process’ trace file(!). Another difference is even SYS is limited, a test with the procedure running as SYS gotten me the ORA-10260 too, PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT does not limit SYS.

Event 10261 has got the same description to at least as low as version 11.2.0.1. Here’s a test with with the event 10261 set at version 11.2.0.3 to 600M:

TS@v11203 > @pga_filler
declare
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00600: internal error code, arguments: [723], [123552], [top uga heap], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []
ORA-06512: at line 20

As has been detailed in the Oracle white paper, prior to version 11.2.0.4, an ORA-600 [723] is signalled when event 10261 is set, and more PGA memory is allocated as has been specified as limit. The amount of total allocated PGA is 677M, so roughly the same as with version 11.2.0.4.

Because this is a genuine ORA-600 (internal error, ‘OERI’), this gives messages in the alert.log file:

Tue Dec 16 10:40:09 2014
Errors in file /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/v11203/v11203/trace/v11203_ora_8963.trc  (incident=9279):
ORA-00600: internal error code, arguments: [723], [123552], [top uga heap], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []
Incident details in: /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/v11203/v11203/incident/incdir_9279/v11203_ora_8963_i9279.trc
Use ADRCI or Support Workbench to package the incident.
See Note 411.1 at My Oracle Support for error and packaging details.

The process’ trace file in the trace directory only points to the incident file, no further details are available there.
The incident trace file contains a complete diagnostics dump.

The behaviour is identical with Oracle 11.2.0.2.

Summary
The limiting of the total amount of PGA memory used must be done using an undocumented event prior to Oracle version 12. The event is 10261. The event is made known in an official white paper. Still I would open a service request with Oracle to ask blessing for setting this. This does not mean this functionality is not needed, I would deem it highly important in almost any environment, even when running a single database: this setting, when done appropriately, protects your system from over allocating memory, which could mean entering the swapping death-spiral. The protection means a process gets an ORA message, and the PGA allocation aborted and deallocated.

With version 11.2.0.4 hitting the limit as set with event 10261 is not published, outside of the process getting the ORA-10260.

With versions prior to 11.2.0.4 (11.2.0.3 and 11.2.0.2 verified) processes do get an ORA-600 [723], which is also visible in the alert.log, and incidents are created accordingly.

When a limit has been set using event 10261, it still means more memory is allocated than set as limit (approximately 677M when 600M is set), but this is way less than with the PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT (1041M when 600M is set) in my specific situation. Test this in your own environment when you start using this.

Important addendum:
A very good comment to emphasise on the behaviour of using/setting event 10261 by Alexander Sidorov: this event sets a limit per process, not for the entire instance!! (tested with 11.2.0.4 and 11.2.0.3)

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Implementation:
One of the important things to realise here is that regardless of asynchronous IO settings (disk_asynch_io, filesystemio_options), Oracle always uses a pread() systemcall, so synchronous IO for reading blocks which are covered with this event. If you realise what the purpose of fetching the single block is in most cases: fetching a single database block which contents are necessary in order to continue processing, it should become apparent that issuing a synchronous IO call makes sense. This is also the reason the V$IOSTAT* view lists both SMALL_READ_REQS, SMALL_SYNC_READ_REQS and SMALL_READ_SERVICETIME, SMALL_SYNC_READ_LATENCY, to make a distinction between SYNC (pread()) reads and non-sync (thus asynchronous) calls, using the io_submit()-io_getevents() call combination.

IO done under the event ‘db file sequential read’ means a single block is read into the buffer cache in the SGA via the system call pread(). Regardless of physical IO speed, this wait always is recorded, in other words: there is a strict relation between the event and the physical IO. Just to be complete: if a block needed is already in the Oracle database buffer cache, no wait event is triggered and the block is read. This is called a logical IO. When the wait event ‘db file sequential read’ is shown, both a physical and a logical IO are executed.

This event means a block is not found in the database buffer cache. It does not mean the block is really read from a physical disk. If DIO (direct IO) is not used (filesystemio_options is set to ‘none’ or ‘async’ when using a filesystem, ASM (alias “Oracle managed raw devices”) is inherently direct path IO, except when the ASM “disks” are on a filesystem (when ASM is used with NFS (!), then filesystemio_options is obeyed)), the block could very well be coming from the filesystem cache of linux. In fact, without DIO a phenomenon known as ‘double buffering’ takes place, which means the IO doesn’t happen to it’s visible disk devices directly, but it needs to take a mandatory step in between, done at the kernel level, which means the data is put in the filesystem cache of linux too. It should be obvious that this extra work comes at the cost of extra CPU cycles being used, and is in almost any case unnecessary.

If you take a step back you should realise this event should take place for a limited amount of blocks during execution. Because of the inherent single block IO nature of db file sequential read, every physical read (when it needs to read from a physical disk device) takes the IO latency penalty. Even with solid state disk devices, which have an inherently lower latency time because there are no rotating parts and disk heads to be moved, chopping up an operation in tiny parts when a full table scan or fast full index scan could be done means a lot of CPU time is used whilst it could be done more efficient.

The time spend on ‘db file sequential read’ quite accurately times single block IO. This means a direct relationship between ‘db file sequential read’ timings and amount should exist with operating system measured IO statistics (iostat, sar and more).

This is a small note describing how Oracle implemented the situation which is covered by the db file parallel read wait event. This events happens if Oracle knows it must read multiple blocks which are not adjacent (thus from different random files and locations), and cannot continue processing with the result of a single block. In other words: if it cannot process something after reading a single block (otherwise Oracle will read a single block visible by the wait ‘db file sequential read’).

This is how it shows up if you enable sql trace:

WAIT #139658359011504: nam='db file parallel read' ela= 69997140 files=1 blocks=70 requests=70 obj#=76227 tim=1373200106669612

What this shows, is Oracle issuing a request for 70 blocks. This has an interesting implication for monitoring and looking at the time spend on the event ‘db file parallel read': if you don’t know the number of blocks for which an IO request is issued, it’s impossible to say something about the time. So just monitoring or looking a cumulative time spend in ‘db file parallel read’ doesn’t say anything about IO latency, it only tells something about where the Oracle process did spend its time on.

How did Oracle implement this? This is obviously port specific (which means the implementation will be different on different operating systems). My test environment is Oracle Linux 6u3 X64, Oracle 11.2.0.3 64 bit using ASM.

This is how the requests are asynchronously submitted to the operating system:

Breakpoint 2, io_submit (ctx=0x7f04c0c8d000, nr=70, iocbs=0x7fff86d965f0) at io_submit.c:23

So all the IO requests are submitted in one go!

After the IO requests are submitted (which is not covered by a wait, which makes sense, because the io_submit call is/is supposed to be non blocking.

Next Oracle waits for ALL the IOs to finish, covered by the ‘db file parallel read’ wait event:

Breakpoint 13, 0x0000000008f9a652 in kslwtbctx ()
Breakpoint 1, io_getevents_0_4 (ctx=0x7f04c0c8d000, min_nr=70, nr=128, events=0x7fff86d9c798, timeout=0x7fff86d9d7a0) at io_getevents.c:46
Breakpoint 14, 0x0000000008fa1334 in kslwtectx ()

We see kslwtbctx which indicates the start of a waitevent, then a io_getevents call:

‘ctx’ is the IO context. This is how Linux keeps track of groups of asynchronous IO requests.
‘min_nr’ is the minimal number of requests that must be ready for this call to succeed, this call will wait until ‘timeout’ is reached. io_getevents will just peek if ‘timeout’ is set to zero.
‘nr’ is the maximal number of requests that io_getevents will “fetch”.
‘events’ is a struct (table like structure) that holds the information about the iocb’s (IO control blocks) of the requests.
‘timeout’ is a struct that sets the timeout of this call. For Oracle IO I see timeout being 600 (seconds) most of the time.

The last line show kslwtectx indicating that the wait has ended.

This is yet another blogpost on Oracle’s direct path read feature which was introduced for non-parallel query processes in Oracle version 11.

For full table scans, a direct path read is done (according to my tests and current knowledge) when:

– The segment is bigger than 5 * _small_table_threshold.
– Less than 50% of the blocks of the table is already in the buffercache.
– Less than 25% of the blocks in the buffercache are dirty.

Also (thanks to Freek d’Hooge who pointed me to an article from Tanel Poder) you can change the optimizer statistics to change the segment size for the direct path decision. Please mind that whilst this uses the statistics the optimizer uses, this is NOT an optimizer decision, but a decision made in the “code path”, so during execution.

So let’s take a look at my lab environment (Oracle Linux 6.3, 64 bit, Oracle 11.2.0.3 and ASM)

Small table threshold:

NAME						   VALUE
-------------------------------------------------- -------
_small_table_threshold				   1011

Table information:

TS@v11203 > select blocks from user_segments where segment_name = 'T2';

    BLOCKS
----------
     21504

So if we take small table threshold times and multiply it by five, we get 5055. This means that the size of table T2 is more than enough so should be scanned via direct path:

TS@v11203 > select s.name, m.value from v$statname s, v$mystat m where m.statistic#=s.statistic# and s.name = 'table scans (direct read)';

NAME								      VALUE
---------------------------------------------------------------- ----------
table scans (direct read)						  0

TS@v11203 > select count(*) from t2;

  COUNT(*)
----------
   1000000

TS@v11203 > select s.name, m.value from v$statname s, v$mystat m where m.statistic#=s.statistic# and s.name = 'table scans (direct read)';

NAME								      VALUE
---------------------------------------------------------------- ----------
table scans (direct read)						  1

Well, that’s that, this seems quite simple.

I’ve created a relatively big table and created a (normal) index on it in the same database. The index is created on a single column, called ‘id’. If I issue a count(id), the whole index needs to be scanned, and Oracle will choose a fast full index scan. A fast full index scan is a scan which just needs to read all the blocks, not necessarily in leaf order. This means it can use multiblock reads (which reads in the order of allocated adjacent blocks).

Let’s check just to be sure:

TS@v11203 > select count(id) from bigtable;

Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 106863591

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation	      | Name	   | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time	   |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT      | 	   |	 1 |	13 | 19662   (2)| 00:03:56 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE       | 	   |	 1 |	13 |		|	   |
|   2 |   INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| I_BIGTABLE |	34M|   425M| 19662   (2)| 00:03:56 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)

If we look at the index size, the size of the index makes this segment a candidate for direct path reads:

TS@v11203 > select blocks from user_segments where segment_name = 'I_BIGTABLE';

    BLOCKS
----------
     72704

If we look at number of small table threshold times five (5055), this index is much bigger than that. Also, this is bigger than table T2. Let’s execute select count(id) from bigtable, and look at the statistic ‘index fast full scans (direct read)':

TS@v11203 > select s.name, m.value from v$statname s, v$mystat m where m.statistic#=s.statistic# and s.name = 'index fast full scans (direct read)';

NAME								      VALUE
---------------------------------------------------------------- ----------
index fast full scans (direct read)					  0

TS@v11203 > select count(id) from bigtable;

 COUNT(ID)
----------
  32000000

TS@v11203 > select s.name, m.value from v$statname s, v$mystat m where m.statistic#=s.statistic# and s.name = 'index fast full scans (direct read)';

NAME								      VALUE
---------------------------------------------------------------- ----------
index fast full scans (direct read)					  0

Huh? This statistic tells me there hasn’t been a direct path read! This means that this read has been done in the “traditional way”. This is a bit…counter intuitive. I’ve traced the session, and indeed it’s doing the traditional multiblock reads via the scattered read waits.

I did a fair bit of fiddling around with the parameters which are reported to be involved, and found out I can get the database to do direct path reads by changing the parameter “_very_large_object_threshold”. The information found on the internet reports this value is in megabytes. A quick stroll through a number of different database (all on 11.2.0.3) shows this parameter is quite probably statically set at “500”.

If I calculate the size in megabytes of the index I_BIGTABLE, the size is 568M. This is clearly higher than the value of “_very_large_object_threshold”. I can get the same index scanned via direct path reads by changing the value of “_very_large_object_threshold” to 100.

This interesting, because it looks like this parameter does the same for full scans on index segments as “_small_table_threshold” does for full scans on table segments: the size of the segment to be scanned needs to be bigger than five times.

There are also differences: small table threshold is set in blocks, (apparently) very large object threshold is set in megabytes. Also, small table threshold is set by default at 2% of the size of the buffercache (so it scales up with bigger caches), very large object threshold seems to be fixed at 500. If my finding is correct, then it means an index segment needs to be bigger than 500*5=2500M to be considered for direct path reads. It’s unknown to me if the 50% limit for blocks in the cache and the 25% limit for dirty blocks is subject to this too.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,393 other followers

%d bloggers like this: