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Tag Archives: ASM

There are many situations where you want to use a very specific configuration of the Oracle database, for example when a client has an issue and is still on EL5, or gets disk errors on a filesystem that is ext3, or is using ASM and gets weird IO patterns. Other examples are: you want to test the newest PSU to see if responds differently to an issue you are working on, or you want to test a combination of the Oracle database version 11.2.0.3 and grid infrastructure 12.1.0.2.

Of course you can just go and install a virtual machine, install all the different bits and pieces. Doing so manually kills vast amounts of time. By doing that, you will end up with a lot of virtual machines, for which at a certain point in time you have to make a decision to remove some of these.

Also a lot of people use a (virtual) machine with a couple of database versions installed, and test on these. In that case you sometimes have to ignore details like filesystemASM, or specific PSU level, it’s hard to keep that updated, but when a client case is in a lower version, in general you don’t go back in PSU level (although not impossible). One thing I ran into frequently is that it’s easy to get caught in side effects because of changes and settings made for earlier test cases (often underscore parameters).

This blogpost introduces my project ‘vagrant-builder’ which allows you to build a virtual machine with Oracle and optionally clusterware installed in any version you specify. The provisioning will download all software and patches (except for the 12.2.0.1 media, which needs to be provided in the ‘files’ directory) fully automatic for you. These are the options:

Linux version:
Oracle linux version 5, 6 or 7 (limited by boxes build by the box-cutter project).
The Actual versions currently existing are ol5.11, ol6.6/7/8, ol7.0/1/2/3. I am awaiting the boxcutter project to produce ol6.9 and ol7.4.

Filesystems:
Filesystem types for u01 and for oradata (when no ASM is used): xfs, ext4, ext3.

Kernel:
Oracle linux 5: latest redhat kernel, latest UEK2 kernel.
Oracle linux 6: any exadata kernel version (if made available on public-yum), latest redhat/UEK2/UEK3/UEK4 kernel.
Oracle linux 7: latest redhat kernel, latest UEK3 or UEK 4 kernel.

ASM:
No ASM install.
12.2.0.1 no patches, PSU: 170620, 170718, 170814
12.1.0.2 no patches, PSU: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 160119, 160419, 160719, 161019, 170117, 170418, 170718, 170814
11.2.0.4 no patches, PSU: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 160119, 160419, 160719, 161019, 170117, 170418, 170718, 170814

Database:
No database install.
12.2.0.1 no patches, PSU: 170620, 170718, 170814
12.1.0.2 no patches, PSU: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 160119, 160419, 160719, 161019, 170117, 170418, 170718, 170814
11.2.0.4 no patches, PSU: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 160119, 160419, 160719, 161019, 170117, 170418, 170718, 170814
11.2.0.3 PSU 15 only.
11.2.0.2 PSU 12 only.

Database:
By specifying a database name, a database will be created with that name. Of course the dictionary part of the patching will be applied to the database!

How does this work? This works using the combination of the following pieces of software:
– Virtualbox
– Vagrant
– Ansible
Plus the vagrant-builder repository: https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/vagrant-builder

If you don’t have Virtualbox, Vagrant or Ansible installed, follow the installation procedure in this blog article; it’s a bit older, so versions of the software components will be higher, you should simply install the latest versions. There is quite an important caveat (sadly): Ansible in principle does not run on windows. You can made it working on windows by using Cygwin, but officially it doesn’t support windows. If you can get the provisioning using Ansible to fully work on windows please share how you did that.

Once you got all the software components installed, another thing you might want to do first is to move your default virtual box directory to a place where you got enough space to hold virtual machines.

Then, clone the vagrant-builder repository into a directory (git clone https://gitlab.com/FritsHoogland/vagrant-builder.git myvm, for example), go into that directory and edit the Vagrantfile to set:
– hostonly_network_ip_address
– mos username & password
– database_name (if you want a database)
– linux (choose one by removing the hash sign in front of it)
– kernel
– asm_version (set a version if you want clusterware “siha” and ASM, if a database_version is set and asm_version is empty, you get a filesystem based database)
– database_version (set a version if you want the database software to be installed)
– vm_cpus (number of CPUs visible/made available to the VM)
– vm_memory (amount of memory made available ot the VM)
– vm_hostname (if you want multiple VMs, you need multiple vm_hostnames set!)
– perl_l4cache_workaround (if you got a newer CPU with a level 4 cache, set this to Y (yes), otherwise set this to N (no))

Save the changes, and startup the virtual machine: ‘vagrant up’. This will pull the operating system image, add a disk for the database, startup linux, setup and configure linux, download the database and grid software version (except for version 12.2.0.1, for which the installation media needs to be staged in the files dictory), install it, download the patches, install these and create a database, without manual intervention.

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I was setting up disk devices for ASM in Oracle Linux 7. I knew things have changed between Oracle Linux 6 and Oracle Linux 7, but only just a little bit.

First of all, let’s take a look at the current disk usage. To see what disk devices are visible and how they are used, use lsblk:

# lsblk
NAME        MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
fd0           2:0    1    4K  0 disk
sda           8:0    0   40G  0 disk
├─sda1        8:1    0  500M  0 part /boot
└─sda2        8:2    0 39.5G  0 part
  ├─ol-swap 253:0    0  3.9G  0 lvm  [SWAP]
  └─ol-root 253:1    0 35.6G  0 lvm  /
sdb           8:16   0   40G  0 disk
sr0          11:0    1 1024M  0 rom

As you can see, I got a floppy disk drive (fd0), a device sda which contains two partitions, sda1 and sda2. The partition sda1 is mounted to /boot. The second partition sda2 is used by LVM, and contains two logical volumes, one for swap, the other has a filesystem that is mounted on /. The device sdb is currently not used (I want to use that for ASM), and there is a device sr0, which is a DVD drive.

The only correct way to use udev (that I am aware of) for disk devices, is using the UUID of the disk. Please mind that if there are multiple connections to the disk/slice presented to the host, which is typically done with fiberchannel connections to a SAN, you should use multipathd to create a multi path device first, and use that device. Each path towards a SAN slice show up as a disk device. The way to distinguish the disk devices from paths is the UUID (with a subtle difference between the SCSI UUID and the WW ID), which is exactly what the multi path daemon uses too. In my setup there are no multiple paths to a disk device.

I want to use gdb as disk for ASM. In order to make sdb accessible for ASM, it needs to have user and group set to oracle. I find it convenient to have the device for usage with ASM in a different place (/dev/oracleasm/), so I can point my ASM_DISKSTRING to the entire directory. This is what we are going to use udev for.

First we need to obtain the UUID. One way of doing this, is via lsscsi:

# lsscsi -i
[1:0:0:0]    cd/dvd  NECVMWar VMware IDE CDR10 1.00  /dev/sr0   -
[2:0:0:0]    disk    VMware,  VMware Virtual S 1.0   /dev/sda   36000c29eea23a3f6b958ca77007bac53
[2:0:1:0]    disk    VMware,  VMware Virtual S 1.0   /dev/sdb   36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040

Now we need to create a udev rules file to make udev create a device for us in /dev/oracleasm, and set the correct permissions. A rules file should be created in /etc/udev/rules.d/. Typically, rules files start with a number, which is used by the udev daemon to understand the sequence/ordering of the rules. In OL7 there are no additional rules files in /etc/udev/rules.d/, which is different from OL6, where multiple rules files are already present.

# vi /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oraccle-asmdevices.rules
KERNEL=="sd*", ENV{ID_SERIAL}=="36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040", SYMLINK+="oracleasm/disk1", OWNER="oracle", GROUP="dba", MODE="0660"

This is the simplest form such a rule can have. The KERNEL matchkey says it should filter only devices matching ‘sd*’, ENV{ID_SERIAL} matches the UUID, SYMLINK creates a symbolic link, and OWNER, GROUP and MODE are obvious. In OL6, you could use NAME instead of SYMLINK which would create the device indicated, and remove the device from the original place (/dev/sdb in my case). In OL7 NAME is not allowed anymore.

At this point a link has been created with the correct permissions to be used with Oracle ASM.

However, udev is a black box to a lot of DBAs and sysadmins. Let’s look a bit deeper into udev!

Obtaining information about a device.
In my case, I wanted to use /dev/sdb. You can look what udev information exists about /dev/sdb by using:

# udevadm info --name sdb
P: /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.0/host2/target2:0:1/2:0:1:0/block/sdb
N: sdb
S: disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
S: disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
S: disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0
E: DEVLINKS=/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040 /dev/disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040 /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0
E: DEVNAME=/dev/sdb
E: DEVPATH=/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.0/host2/target2:0:1/2:0:1:0/block/sdb
E: DEVTYPE=disk
E: ID_BUS=scsi
E: ID_MODEL=VMware_Virtual_S
E: ID_MODEL_ENC=VMware\x20Virtual\x20S
E: ID_PATH=pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0
E: ID_PATH_TAG=pci-0000_00_10_0-scsi-0_0_1_0
E: ID_REVISION=1.0
E: ID_SCSI=1
E: ID_SCSI_SERIAL=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
E: ID_SERIAL=36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
E: ID_SERIAL_SHORT=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
E: ID_TYPE=disk
E: ID_VENDOR=VMware_
E: ID_VENDOR_ENC=VMware\x2c\x20
E: ID_WWN=0x6000c2912554c8f4
E: ID_WWN_VENDOR_EXTENSION=0x4edc68106edd5040
E: ID_WWN_WITH_EXTENSION=0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
E: MAJOR=8
E: MINOR=16
E: SUBSYSTEM=block
E: TAGS=:systemd:
E: USEC_INITIALIZED=176567

This is all the information that udev sees currently, with no (custom) udev rule applied to it.

Testing udev rules.
Next up, we need to write a udev rules file. You can test the results of a udev rule using udevadm test. I’ve put ‘KERNEL==”sd*”, ENV{ID_SERIAL}==”36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040″, NAME+=”oracleasm/disk1″, OWNER=”oracle”, GROUP=”dba”, MODE=”0660″‘ in /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules, which is the OL6 version, which contains NAME as key, which is not allowed with OL7. Let’s test this specific rule:

# udevadm test /sys/block/sdb
calling: test
version 219
This program is for debugging only, it does not run any program
specified by a RUN key. It may show incorrect results, because
some values may be different, or not available at a simulation run.

=== trie on-disk ===
tool version:          219
file size:         6984832 bytes
header size             80 bytes
strings            1805856 bytes
nodes              5178896 bytes
Load module index
Created link configuration context.
timestamp of '/etc/udev/rules.d' changed
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/10-dm.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/100-balloon.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/11-dm-lvm.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/13-dm-disk.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/40-redhat.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/42-usb-hid-pm.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/50-udev-default.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-alias-kmsg.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-cdrom_id.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-drm.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-keyboard.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-net.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-alsa.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-input.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-serial.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage-tape.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-v4l.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-raw.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/61-accelerometer.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/64-btrfs.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/69-dm-lvm-metad.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/70-mouse.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/70-power-switch.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/70-touchpad.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/70-uaccess.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/71-biosdevname.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/71-seat.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/73-idrac.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/73-seat-late.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/75-net-description.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/75-probe_mtd.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/75-tty-description.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/78-sound-card.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/80-drivers.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/80-net-name-slot.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/80-net-setup-link.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/81-kvm-rhel.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/85-nm-unmanaged.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/90-alsa-tools-firmware.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/90-iprutils.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/90-vconsole.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/91-drm-modeset.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/95-dm-notify.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/95-udev-late.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/98-kexec.rules
Reading rules file: /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules
Reading rules file: /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/99-systemd.rules
rules contain 24576 bytes tokens (2048 * 12 bytes), 12641 bytes strings
1896 strings (23762 bytes), 1263 de-duplicated (11755 bytes), 634 trie nodes used
IMPORT 'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:40
starting 'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_SCSI=1'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_VENDOR=VMware_'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_VENDOR_ENC=VMware\x2c\x20'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_MODEL=VMware_Virtual_S'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_MODEL_ENC=VMware\x20Virtual\x20S'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_REVISION=1.0'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_TYPE=disk'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_SERIAL=36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_SERIAL_SHORT=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_WWN=0x6000c2912554c8f4'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_WWN_VENDOR_EXTENSION=0x4edc68106edd5040'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_WWN_WITH_EXTENSION=0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb'(out) 'ID_SCSI_SERIAL=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
'scsi_id --export --whitelisted -d /dev/sdb' [3130] exit with return code 0
LINK 'disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:42
IMPORT builtin 'path_id' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:55
LINK 'disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:56
IMPORT builtin 'blkid' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:72
probe /dev/sdb raid offset=0
LINK 'disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' /usr/lib/udev/rules.d/60-persistent-storage.rules:82
no db file to read /run/udev/data/+scsi:2:0:1:0: No such file or directory
OWNER 54321 /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules:1
GROUP 54322 /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules:1
MODE 0660 /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules:1
NAME="oracleasm/disk1" ignored, kernel device nodes can not be renamed; please fix it in /etc/udev/rules.d/99-oracle-asmdevices.rules:1
handling device node '/dev/sdb', devnum=b8:16, mode=0660, uid=54321, gid=54322
preserve permissions /dev/sdb, 060660, uid=54321, gid=54322
preserve already existing symlink '/dev/block/8:16' to '../sdb'
found 'b8:16' claiming '/run/udev/links/\x2fdisk\x2fby-id\x2fscsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
creating link '/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' to '/dev/sdb'
preserve already existing symlink '/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' to '../../sdb'
found 'b8:16' claiming '/run/udev/links/\x2fdisk\x2fby-id\x2fwwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040'
creating link '/dev/disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' to '/dev/sdb'
preserve already existing symlink '/dev/disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040' to '../../sdb'
found 'b8:16' claiming '/run/udev/links/\x2fdisk\x2fby-path\x2fpci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0'
creating link '/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0' to '/dev/sdb'
preserve already existing symlink '/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0' to '../../sdb'
created db file '/run/udev/data/b8:16' for '/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.0/host2/target2:0:1/2:0:1:0/block/sdb'
.ID_FS_TYPE_NEW=
ACTION=KERNEL=="sd*", ENV{ID_SERIAL}=="36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040", NAME+="oracleasm/disk1", OWNER="oracle", GROUP="dba", MODE="0660"
DEVLINKS=/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040 /dev/disk/by-id/wwn-0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040 /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0
DEVNAME=/dev/sdb
DEVPATH=/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.0/host2/target2:0:1/2:0:1:0/block/sdb
DEVTYPE=disk
ID_BUS=scsi
ID_FS_TYPE=
ID_MODEL=VMware_Virtual_S
ID_MODEL_ENC=VMware\x20Virtual\x20S
ID_PATH=pci-0000:00:10.0-scsi-0:0:1:0
ID_PATH_TAG=pci-0000_00_10_0-scsi-0_0_1_0
ID_REVISION=1.0
ID_SCSI=1
ID_SCSI_SERIAL=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
ID_SERIAL=36000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
ID_SERIAL_SHORT=6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
ID_TYPE=disk
ID_VENDOR=VMware_
ID_VENDOR_ENC=VMware\x2c\x20
ID_WWN=0x6000c2912554c8f4
ID_WWN_VENDOR_EXTENSION=0x4edc68106edd5040
ID_WWN_WITH_EXTENSION=0x6000c2912554c8f44edc68106edd5040
MAJOR=8
MINOR=16
SUBSYSTEM=block
TAGS=:systemd:
USEC_INITIALIZED=176567
Unload module index
Unloaded link configuration context.

As you can see in the highlighted row, udev recognised the device from the rule and applied the settings, but it ignored NAME, because it is not allowed to rename kernel device nodes. When you need to use udev, it’s very important you run a test like this to check for the validity of the syntax and if the rule actually does what you want it to do, and the correct line in the udev rules file is applied (you can see the rules file and row number in lines 90-93).

Applying a udev rule from a rules file.
After you tested the your new udev rule, and made sure it does what you want, you need to apply the rule. You can specifically apply it for the device using the following command:

# udevadm trigger --name sdb

During some testing I encountered an ORA-000214 during startup of an Oracle 11.2.0.2 database instance:

ORA-00214: control file '+RECO_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.334.755391511'
version 268 inconsistent with file
'+DATA_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.299.755390399' version 265

This is a RAC instance on Exadata, but all techniques in this article will work on any Oracle 11.2.x database using ASM.

This message means the database found two controlfiles which have a different version. If this message appears when the database is open, the database will crash. If an instance is startup after this message, the same error appears, and the database remains in nomount state. Further diagnosis: the control file version in the recovery area is more recent than the version in the data diskgroup (version 268 versus version 265).

The obvious and correct way of resolving this issue is to copy the latest control file version in the recovery area over the older one in the data diskgroup.

The most simple and obvious way is to use asmcmd:

[oracle@xxxxdb01 [test1] ~]$ +ASM1
The Oracle base for ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/11.2.0/grid is /u01/app/oracle
[oracle@xxxxdb01 [+ASM1] ~]$ asmcmd

ASMCMD> cp +RECO_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.334.755391511 +DATA_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.299.755390399
copying +RECO_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.334.755391511 -> +DATA_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.299.755390399
ASMCMD-08016: copy source->'+RECO_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.334.755391511' and target->'+DATA_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.299.755390399' failed
ORA-15056: additional error message
ORA-15046: ASM file name '+DATA_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.299.755390399' is not in single-file creation form
ORA-06512: at "SYS.X$DBMS_DISKGROUP", line 410
ORA-06512: at line 3 (DBD ERROR: OCIStmtExecute)
ASMCMD>

This means asmcmd can not be used to copy the controlfile.

The resolution for this issue is to use rman to copy the controlfile:

[oracle@xxxxdb01 [test1] ~]$ rman target /

Recovery Manager: Release 11.2.0.2.0 - Production on Sat Jul 2 17:23:32 2011

Copyright (c) 1982, 2009, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

connected to target database: TEST (not mounted)

RMAN> restore controlfile to '+DATA_XXXX' from '+RECO_XXXX/controlfile/current.334.755391511';

Starting restore at 02-JUL-11
using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
channel ORA_DISK_1: SID=847 instance=test1 device type=DISK

channel ORA_DISK_1: copied control file copy
Finished restore at 02-JUL-11

RMAN> exit

By only specifying the diskgroup, a new controlfile is created using OMF (Oracle Managed Files) naming.

At this point we have a valid, consistent control file in the data diskgroup, in order for the database to be able to use it, we need to do the following tasks:
– Gather the name of the new, consistent controlfile in the data diskgroup.
– Remove the old, inconsistent controlfile in the data diskgroup.
– Set the control_files parameter to use the new, copied version in the data diskgroup and use the copy in the recovery area.

Gather the name of the new controlfile in the data diskgroup:
[oracle@xxxxdb01 [+ASM1] ~]$ asmcmd
ASMCMD> find -t controlfile +DATA_EMC1/test *
WARNING:option 't' is deprecated for 'find'
please use 'type'

+DATA_XXXX/test/CONTROLFILE/current.299.755390399
+DATA_XXXX/test/CONTROLFILE/current.314.755457847
ASMCMD>
We know the old, inconsistent version from the errormessage: current.299.755390399. So the new version is current.314.755457847.

Remove the old one:
ASMCMD> rm +DATA_EMC1/test/CONTROLFILE/current.299.755390399

And set the parameter and bounce the instance to test if it works:
[oracle@xxxxdb01 [+ASM1] ~]$ test1
The Oracle base for ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1 is /u01/app/oracle
[oracle@xxxxdb01 [test1] ~]$ sq

SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Sat Jul 2 17:30:22 2011

Copyright (c) 1982, 2010, Oracle. All rights reserved.

Connected to:
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, Real Application Clusters, OLAP, Data Mining
and Real Application Testing options

SQL> alter system set control_files='+DATA_XXXX/test/CONTROLFILE/current.314.755457847','+RECO_XXXX/test/controlfile/current.334.755391511' scope=spfile sid='*';

System altered.

SQL> startup force;
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 1043886080 bytes
Fixed Size 2233088 bytes
Variable Size 478153984 bytes
Database Buffers 423624704 bytes
Redo Buffers 139874304 bytes
Database mounted.
Database opened.
SQL>

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